Skip to content

Chicken wiblets: More children’s book reviews

July 6, 2012

I’m back to work and totally overwhelmed with books!

Easy Readers!

Pirates by Philip Steel is a level 4 Kingfisher Reader which is a little weird.  There’s blood and guts (well, heads) galore, but it’s in the little guys’ section AND it’s got words like “slaves” and “ransom” in the glossary.  Really?  Your kid needs “slave” defined but a head on a mast is cool?

These books are oddly cataloged, I gotta say.

Thea Feldman’s Baby Animals is cute AND it shows you babies that need mothers and babies that are ready to go out of the womb/egg/whatever.  Neat!  Great level one.

Feldman also does an excellent level one called Insects in Action! that’s put out in partnership with the American Museum of Natural History.

Actually, I can see her name elsewhere in the pile too.  I think we must’ve realized we like her or something!

Another American Museum book is Connie Roop’s levl 2 reader, Penguins Are Cool!  Yes, they are, Connie.  Yes they are.  The book is good too.  Lots of information simply presented, but not overwhelming at all.

Brenda Stones’s level 2 Kingfisher book, Your Body, is a mishmash of information, but a good overview.  Definitely not the strongest I’ve seen.

I know I don’t usually bop around like this, but I am busy and tired.  I apologize.  Also, I’m working with a bit of a drawback here due to my injury.

So, that said: Trains, by Feldman again.  Level one Kingfisher.  (I think they were at NJLA this year.)  I like this woman a lot.  She makes things simple and easy, but informative.  It’s noy easy to write an Easy Reader, as I’ve said before.  Props to her.

One last Kingfisher: What Animals Eat, a level two by by Stones again.  Informative, but without introduction or conclusion, which bothers me with children’s non-fiction because these are supposed to be their building blocks.  It should mimic what they’ll be reading later.  Also, vegetarians are mentioned, which is cool, and if frogs are herbivores as tadpoles and carnivores as adults, does that make them omnivores?

Finally, Pinkalicious: Soccer Star, a wordy level one by Victoria Kann.  Oh okay, there’s a unicorn.  And stuff.  Boy, am I missing Fancy Nancy right now.  At least she brings something to the table.

Board books!

DK’s My First Baby Animals Touch and Feel is pretty much a waste.  All the animals “feel” the same, except for some that just don’t work (ice? “tap the hooves”?).  I have been spoiled by the That’s Not My… series, I swear.

Maisy’s Christmas Day by Lucy Cousins is cute as a button.  Maisy still freaks me out with her baby-actions/cooking dinner/living alone like an adult thing, but hey.  The Gummi Bears did it, right?

Okay, okay, didn’t I just get all these DK Touch and Feel books by Dawn Sirrett?  Oh no, those were other DK books.  I now have Baby Animals, Kitten, Farm, Puppy, Dinosaur, Tractor, and Jungle Animals.  THIS is how you do it, DK book above.  Although sandpaper for a pig seems wrong.  Dinosaur is kinda silly too, but won me over with the sticky tongue.  (I’m not sure I got all the authors, because we catalog them by name, WHATEVER.)

Picture books!

Basher 1 2 3 didn’t win me over the way the ABCs did, but still: cutest counting book ever.

Where Do Baby Animals Come From? (And baby people too) by Anna Milbourne and Serena Riglietti is a very simple book for very young kids on the question of brothers and sisters.  Babies come out “near the tail” or whatever; the baby penguin penguin says things like “Whyever.”  It’s good for parents who don’t want to deal with any real information.

Outside of board books, DK’s Hide and Seek Farm is the most beginner of seek-and-find books.  I’d say it’s almost insulting, until you get to the end and do things like shapes and silhouettes and close-ups.  Good for very littles.

Okay, that’s it for the week.  Tune in next week when I have another pile or three of books to route in and check for sticky pages, typos, cataloging errors, and crap content.

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: